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I F37 
8:S98 

1979/80 CO 
Teacher ] 

by Adeline McCall 




North Carolina Chamber Symphony 

CHILDREN'S CONCERTS 
1979-1980 Season 
Editor and Program Director - Richard L. Walker 



The North Carolina Chamber Symphony Orchestra 
CHILDREN'S CONCERTS 

Season 1979-1980 



TIPS TO TEACHERS 



Copyright by Adeline McCall, 19 7 9 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/tipstoteachers1980mcca 



TIPS TO TEACHERS 

by Adeline McCall 

CONTENTS 

A credo for Teachers from FOREVER GROWING by Paul Green 

Getting Ready for your North Carolina Symphony Orchestra Concert 

Children's Concert Program and List of Recordings . . . Season 1979 - 80 

Some Suggestions on Concert Preparation 

Notes on the Children's Program 

OVERTURE — "The Barber of Seville" 

MUSIC FOR THE KING'S SUPPER — Mouret 
Rondeau 
Gigue 
Fanfares 

THE PERCUSSION SCORE 

SONG: THE PIPER'S TUNE — Bach 

PULCINELLA SUITE — Stravinsky 
Sinf onia 
Tarantella 
Toccata 
Vivo 
Minuet 
Finale 

THE LITTLE WHITE DONKEY — Ibert 

BALLET SUITE No. 1 -- Shostakovich 
Petite Ballerina 
Pizzicato Polka 

SONG: JOHN HENRY — American Folk Song 

JOHN HENRY — Copland 

SOIREES MUSICALES — Rossini-Britten 
March 

Bibliography — Books and Filmstrips 

Some Suggestions for New Teachers — Creative Movement 

North Carolina Symphony P. 0. Box 28026 Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 

Richard L. Walker, Director of Education 



A CREDO FOR TEACHERS 

from 

"Forever Growing" by Paul Green 

LIFE IS LIKE A TREE FOREVER GROWING, AND MAN IS A PART OF THAT LIFE. 

The excellence of a tree depends on how fine a tree it is and becomes. 
The excellence of an animal the same. The excellence of a man the same. 

Now man has a conscious means of working towards his own excellence — 
himself, his self, the soul. In fact the self or soul gives him his drive, 
his inspiration, the meaning of his life — - to develop and improve himself and 
his world in beauty about him. 

So now begins the problem of man's ritual and curriculum towards the 
higher ideal of the spirit, that ideal and art . And here the trouble lies 
both for him and for the teacher. 

What, then, is the answer? What should a teacher teach? How should he 
approach the subject? 

Why, teach the subject itself, approach the subject itself, approach the 
subject directly and do not put up labels and curtains that stand opaque and 
dividing between the seer and the seen. Get the student close to the object 
of his interest. Let him work at it too. Let him try his hand in practice. 
Let him experience the poem, or whatever it is, in the raw, in its 
natural wonder. 

And here is the planet we call the earth its soil has been 

tilled for untold milleniums and yet its strength is not exhausted, nor will 
it be exhausted. Treat it creatively, give it a little rain, a little sun, 
and spring and summer and teeming autumn with all their fruits and beauties 
will pour themselves into the air again. So it is with man as with the earth. 

For he is a quickened spirit, a self. He is neither scientist, pharisee, 
homo sapiens, classicist, romanticist, animal, nor humanist. He is a self, 
a living being, a personality, a soul. And he has his visions, his freedom 
of will and his ideals accordingly, and his essential nature is creativeness. 
There is in him a primal impulse and impetus towards the making of a truly 
beautiful and vital world. And however obscured, hindered, detoured by false 
doctrines and prophets, he will continue to strive towards that goal. But he 
needs help and that is the purpose of all teaching — to help him and help 
him creatively. 

THIS IS MY CREDO. 

Copyright, 1945, Paul Green, U.N.C. Press 
Used by permission of the author. 



GETTING READY 
for your 
NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Start as early as possible to publicize the coming of the 
NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
to your community 

1. Through pictures and articles in local papers 

2. Through radio and television announcements 

3. Through memos to parents 

SEE THAT Principals, Teachers and School Administrators have correct information 

on the DATE, THE DAY OF THE WEEK, and THE HOUR of the children's concert set in 

their schedules. Avoid conflicts by checking with the School Superintendent 
before sending out notices. 

BE SURE TO INFORM Cafeteria Managers, Librarians, Teachers' Aides and Assistants 
about the concert. 

FOLLOW UP with announcements at teachers' meetings, P T A meetings, and on 
bulletin boards. 

ARRANGE FOR A DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION to work out bus schedules, and notify 
local police to cooperate in providing an escort, and blocking streets. 
Inform each school of the route to be taken; where to load and unload, etc. 

MAKE A SEATING PLAN FOR THE CONCERT, and send copies to all schools with directions 
for entering and leaving the concert hall. 

SCHEDULE IN-SERVICE Teachers' Workshops to prepare for the children's program. 
Invite art teachers, school librarians, special teachers, aides, and assistants. 

ORDER ALL MATERIALS 
AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE 



An important part of concert preparation is familiarizing children with the music 
through listening to recordings, and reading stories about the music and the 
composers in their classrooms. 

ORDER THE RECORDINGS. These are listed with the children's program on page 3. 
In order to facilitate the circulation of records, one complete set for 
every six or eight teachers is recommended. 

ORDER SYMPHONY STORIES. Each child should have his own individual copy of these 
booklets. Materials printed in Symphony Stories are copyrighted, and may 
not be duplicated. 



Address all orders to North Carolina Symphony, Richard L. Walker, Director of 
Education, P. 0. Box 28026, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611. 



THE NORTH CAROLINA CHAMBER SYMPHONY . Season 1979 - 1980 

John Gosling, Artistic Director /Conductor 
James Ogle, Associate Conductor 
Jackson Parkhurst, Assistant Conductor 
Benjamin Swalin, Conductor Emeritus 



ROSSINI 



MOURET 



BACH 
STRAVINSKY 



IBERT 



SHOSTAKOVICH 



AMERICAN 
FOLK SONG 

COPLAND 



ROSSINI-BRITTEN 



CHILDREN'S CONCERT PROGRAM 
OVERTURE — "The Barber of Seville" 



MUSIC FOR THE KING'S SUPPER 
Rondeau 
Gigue 
Fanfares 

Song: THE PIPER'S TUNE 

PULCINELLA SUITE 
Sinf onia 
Tarantella 
Toccata 
Vivo 
Minuet 
Finale 

THE LITTLE WHITE DONKEY 



BALLET SUITE NO. 1 



Song: JOHN HENRY 
JOHN HENRY 

SOIREES MUSICALES 
March 



VOX 

STLP 511-180 

TURNABOUT 
TVS - 34232 



COLUMBIA 
MS-7093 



*RCA VICTOR 
Adventures in Music, 2 
LE-1001 

-RCA VICTOR 

Adventures in Music, 1 
LE-1000, also 
Adventures in Music, 2 
LE-1001 



COLUMBIA 
M 33586 

*RCA VICTOR 

Adventures in Music, I 
LE-1000 



*Check your school record collection for RCA Adventures in Music, Grades 1 and 2 



m 



International Year 
of the Child 1979 



As you play these recordings for children emphasize the importance of 

QUIET LISTENING 



SOME SUGGESTIONS ON CONCERT PREPARATION 



1. The purpose of your in-service teachers' workshops is to present the music 

to be played at the children's concert. Have the 
recordings assembled in order to demonstrate various 
ways of bringing the music to life. Ask teachers to 
participate by offering suggestions and demonstrating 
their ideas. 

1) Teach the two songs 

2) Teach the percussion score 

3) Show films and filmstrips 

4) Demonstrate creative movement 

5) Suggest art activities 

6) Encourage original writing on various 
phases of the program 

2. Give the children's concert program to all school librarians. See that the 
recordings are catalogued and made ready for circulation. Ask the libra- 
rarians as resource teachers to plan for the showing of related films and 
filmstrips; to set aside reference shelves for books about the music, and 
for biographies of the composers; to include information about the music 
and the composers in their scheduled story hours. 

3. Classroom teachers have a most important role in making symphony preparation 
an interesting and enjoyable experience. In some elementary schools teachers 
plan "mini-workshops," sharing their ideas and demonstrating various aspects 
of their children's activities with others. In an auditorium or multi- 
purpose room, three or four grades can assemble for an hour of more. It 
should be the responsibility of one class to have the floor or stage cleared, 
and to set up the record player in advance. 

4. In schools with central public address systems, special programs may be 
presented for classroom listening. The symphony-related programs could be 
planned by a principal, an interested parent, a musician from the community, 
a child, or a group of children. 

5. Players in high school or junior high school orchestras are sometimes 
available to bring their instruments and give a classroom demonstration. 

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES 

Learn to recognize the orchestral instruments by signt and sound. Read books 
and view filmstrips or films related to the symphony orchestra. Write and 
illustrate stories about composers and their music. 

Paint murals, posters, pictures; construct simple percussion instruments. 
Create free movement after listening to the recordings; dance to the music. 
Write a puppet play; make the puppets and construct a stage; perform for 
other classes. Make illustrated "symphony" notebooks; plan bulletin board 
displays. Get in touch with a local radio station or television station to 
find out if there might be a possible tie-in with the music to be played 
at the concert. 



THE NORTH CAROLINA CHAMBER SYMPHONY SEASON 1979 - 1980 



John Gosling, Artistic Director and Conductor 
James Ogle, Associate Conductor 
Jackson Parkhurst, Assistant Conductor 
Benjamin Swalin, Conductor Emeritus 



NOTES 



N 



THE 



CHILDREN 



CONCERT 



PROGRAM 



I. OVERTURE — "The Barber of Seville' 
Giocchino Rossini 
1792 - 1868 



VOX 

STLP 511-180 



The opening number on your Little Symphony concert is the Overture 
to the opera, "The Barber of Seville," by Giocchino (Zhee-o-ah-kee-no) 
Rossini. An operatic Overture is an introduction to an opera, oratorio 
or similar work. It is used to prepare the audience for a "mood" 
before the first scene. Moaart's "Don Giovanni" and "Magic Flute" 
Overtures are examples of "mood" setting. Melodies from the opera are 
often included. 



Sometimes an Overture is an independent orchestral number, performed 
as a concert piece, for example: Brahms' "Academic Festival Overture" 
and Mendelssohn's "Overture to a Midsummer Night's Dream." In the early 
Italian opera the overture was called "Sinfonia." The orchestra 
consisted of muscellaneous instruments such as a harpsichord, lutes, 
bass viol, and flutes. 

After listening to the Overture a few times you might discuss with 
your children whether or not the Overture sets the mood for the opera. 
The story of "The Barber of Seville" is in Symphony Stories but 
this short version should be only an introduction to other classroom 
activities. Here are some suggestions: 

1) View the Jam Handy color filmstrip, "The Barber of Seville," with 
the recorded music - No. 4 from Opera and Ballet Stories . 

2) Suggest that the children make a list of the characters in the 
opera, describing each one with a sentence or two. 

3) Then create each character in movement — dance improvisation 
and pantomime. 

4) Let the children write the story of the opera in their own words. 

5) This may lead to the selection of an original script for the production 
of a play or puppet show. 



A book to read ; THE BARBER OF SEVILLE - the story of the opera retold by 
Johanna Johnston; attractive illustrations in color and in black and white. 
Published by G. P. Putnam's Sons in cooperation with the Metropolitan Opera 
Guild. 

About the Composer 

. . .Gioacchino Antonio Rossini, born in 1792 in an Italian town on the Adriatic 
Sea, had every opportunity to absorb music at an early age. His mother was 
a fine singer, and his father was the town trumpeter. Because of his out- 
spoken political views father Rossini found himself in jail, and his wife 
took her son to Bologna where in a short time she made a success as prima 
donna in opera buff a (comic opera). Once released from jail the father 
joined his wife and son and was hired as trumpeter in the opera's orchestra. 

...Both parents wanted their son to have a good music education. Eventually 
they found a teacher who taught him to play the piano, to read notes, and 
to sing well enough to be a boy soprano in the church. When he was ten 
years old his mother's voice wore out, and before long the boy was able to 
help support the family by singing in the theatre and playing horn in the 
orchestra beside his father. After several years he entered the Conserva- 
tory of Bologna where he studied cello and harmony and composition. 

. . .When his teacher told him that while long years of study were necessary 
to compose church music, he already knew as much as most opera composers. 
The boy's answer was: "Then I need nothing more — for peraas are all I 
want to write." About this time his family was having financial problems. 

...So Rossini left the Conservatory and all further study to become a composer 
of operas. He was only eighteen when he made a success of his first opera 
buff a. One success followed another. At twenty-four he composed "The Barber 
of Seville." The Barber in this opera is Figaro, the hero of Mozart's 
"Marriage of Figaro." The story of "The Barber of Seville" begins 
before Figaro's courtship of Susannah. His master, the Count Almaviva, is 
not yet married, and the schemes of Figaro succeed in winning for him the 
beautiful young Rosina despite the protests of her enraged guardian, 
Dr. Bartolo. 

...Rossini's success was phenomenal. In Italy, more performances of his operas 
were given than those of all other composers put together. It was the same 
in Leipzig, London, Paris, and all the great European cities. In some opera 
houses the whole season was given up to his works alone. 

...In Rossini's operas there were no long interludes of half-spoken, half -sung 
"recitative." He used the orchestra all the way through. If an important 
melody was played by a horn, he made the accompanying parts softer so that 
his musical idea came through clearly. 

. . .Although Rossini became famous as a composer of opera buf fa, he turned to 

opera seria (serious or tragic opera) when he married a prima donna who could 
sing nothing else. His masterpiece, "William Tell" is a grand opera, lasting 
over five hours. It is rarely performed, but the Overture to "William Tell" 
is familiar to television and concert audiences almost everywhere. 



II. MUSIC FOR THE KING'S SUPPER 
Rondeau 
Gigue 
Fanfares 
Jean- Joseph Mouret 
1782 - 1738 



Turnabout 
TVS - 34232 



During the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV of France the palaces 
were scenes of an endless number of ceremonies, balls, and courtly 
entertainments. There was music for all these events; and there 
was music to wake up by, music for breakfast, and music for the 
King's elaborate suppers. 

The composer and director of music for many of these royal occasions 
(described in Symphony Stories ) was Jean- Joseph Mouret. Three of 
his compositions from "Music for the King's Supper" will be played 
at your children's concert: 1) RONDEAU 2) GIGUE and 3) FANFARES. 
The instruments used in the three numbers are listed below: 

1st and 2nd trumpets 

1st and 2nd oboes 

1st and 2nd violins 

Timpani 

Double basses 

Bassoons 

Listening Highlights 

RONDEAU 

Some children in your classes will recognize this as the theme for 
Masterpiece Theatre on television. The percussion score on the 
outside back cover of Symphony Stories was written to play in the 
classroom with the recording. 

As a listening aid you will find it helpful to outline the form 

and describe the instruments used in each section. The form is A B A. 



A - a Tutti 
a Tutti 



8 measures 
8 measures 



Violins & oboes 8 measures 



a Tutti 

B - Violins & oboes 

A - a Tutti 
a Tutti 



8 measures 

20 measures 

8 measures 
8 measures 



"Tutti" includes trumpets, violins, oboes, timpani, basses and bassoons 

GIGUE 

In this fast 6/8 meter, violins and oboes alternate with the whole orchestra: 

A - Violins and oboes 4 measures Tutti 4 measures 

B -||'.Violins and oboes 4 measures Tutti 4 measures^ | 



FANFARES 

In this number the violins as a single group alternate with the whole orchestra: 

2/4 |j;Tutti 8 measures Violins 6 measures ;|| 

jjj Tutti 2 measures I Violins 2 measures | Tutti 2 measures j Violins 2 measures! 

ITutti 2 measures \ Violins 2 measures ( Tutti 6 measures | Violins 2 measures 

| Tutti 4 measures | Violins 2 measures ( Tutti 3 measures *\\ 

As children begin to hear the changes in instrumentation, they may want to dance to 
the music. It seems only natural to divide dancers into two groups: a small group 
(or solo dancer) and a larger group for the "tuttis." A variety of movements may be 
suggested that do not involve moving across the floor. 

About the composer 

Jean- Joseph Mouret was born in that famous French town of Avignon in southern France 
on April 11, 1682. It was noted for its musical life. The people sang and danced. 
They attended concerts, operas and theatre productions. There were fine church 
schools and music schools in Avignon. And there were many musicians ready to play 
for the festivals, fairs and celebrations that took place. The Popes lived in 
Avignon from 1309 to 1377, and singers at the Papal Court were renowned throughout 
Europe. 

Perhaps the most celebrated of all the things that made Avignon famous was its 
bridge. The bridge of Avignon was built hundreds of years ago across the river Rhone, 
and joined the cities of Avignon and Villeneuve. Only four of the original nineteen 
arches are left to remind us of the shepherd boy Benedict, whose faith made the 
bridge possible. According to the story Benedict heard a voice from heaven commanding 
him to build a bridge across the Rhone. When he told the Bishop about it, the Bishop 
would not give his blessing to the project unless the boy would carry a slab of rock 
to the edge of the river to be the keystone of the first arch. Benedict lifted and 
carried the huge rock with such ease that the people, awed by the miracle, came 
with gifts of money and of labor to make the dream come true. As each arch was finished 
there was great celebration until finally the bridge was finished. The song "Sur le 
Pont d' Avignon" (On the Bridge of Avignon) is still sung by children to celebrate 
the building of the bridge, and in honor of little Benedict. 

The song is found in a number of music texts. This story, and a copy of the song 
is in the Teachers' edition of "This is Music for Today" Book 3, Allyn and Bacon, 
Publishers. 

Jean- Joseph Mouret became a church organist, a director of orchestras and festivals, 
and a composer for the Italian Theatre. He wrote ballets, operas, motets, cantatas, 
chamber music and symphonies. 



THE PERCUSSION SCORE 

RONDEAU from MUSIC FOR THE KING'S SUPPER by Jean-Joseph Mouret Turnabout 

TVS - 34232 

The percussion score is for classroom use only 

DO NOT BRING PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS TO THE CHILDREN'S CONCERT 

Note: The percussion score is printed on the outside back cover of "Symphony Stories" 

Each child can prop up the score on his desk or table by placing a 
book on top of page 12, "Symphony Stories." 

Teaching Procedures 

1. Arrange to have all the required percussion instruments at each 
child's place ahead of time. Do not pass them out . You will need: 

DRUMS 

TAMBOURINES 

RHYTHM STICKS 

MARACAS 

JINGLE BELLS ON A HANDLE 

TRIANGLES 

CYMBALS 

FINGER CYMBALS 

2. Play the recording a number of times for listening only. 

3. Looking at the score, explain the meter ^- %/%•• 

Note that there are four quarter notes (or their equivalent) in 

each measure, counted in "twos." This is alia breve time. 

The first note is an "up-beat" - the last half of the second count. 

4. Count the meter out loud: lone - two | one - two | (Or 1 and 2 and) 

5. Swing the meter, moving both arms j DOWN - UP I DOWN - UP J etc. 

6. "Conduct" the meter with one hand: , Jf* 

7. Clap the first beat in each measure. 

8. Have the children find measures in which there are patterns other than 
four quarter notes, and write them on the board. 

For instance : (Clap or tap each pattern with a pencil on the desk or table.) 

9. Let children change places as the score is repeated so that they have the 
experience of playing a variety of percussion instruments. 



10 



III. SONG: THE PIPER'S TUNE 

Accompaniment : This is Music, Book 5 

Accompaniment Edition, p. 23 
Allyn & Bacon, 1962 



From the "Peasant 
Cantata" by Johann 
Sebastian Bach 



THE PIPER'S TUNE IS PRINTED ON THE INSIDE FRONT COVER OF SYMPHONY STORIES. 
Children should memorize two stanzas of the song to sing with the orches- 
tra. They are not permitted to bring copies of the words or the music 
into the concert hall. 

Practice the song ahead of time without the aid of a piano accompaniment. 

Bach wrote this lively dance tune for his "Peasant Cantata" to be performed 
at a celebration honoring a new ruler in the part of Germany where he lived. 
It describes how pipers take part in the outdoor activities by playing 
for the dancing. 

The song is like a bourree, a spirited French dance in duple time. 
Note the time signature is all a breve - 2/2 meter 

TEACHING THE SONG 



n dupJ 

- i 



Call attention to the fact that the form of the song is A A B A. 
There are only two different musical phrases to be learned. 

Teach the song in two parts. Some teachers like to have the class learn 
the lower line first, then the soprano. If both parts are well memorized, 
it gives solidity to the performance. 

The song begins on the last half of the second count. In conducting, 
divide each measure in "twos" not in "fours." For example: 



\r 



As a 



preparatory beat count "two" will probably be sufficient : /?*)4 ) 






After the orchestra has played "Fanfares" from MUSIC FOR THE KING'S 
SUPPER, the conductor will invite the audience to stand. Tell the children 
to watch carefully for his signal to stand . The orchestra will play an 
Introduction before the conductor gives the audience the cue to begin 
singing . 

IMPRESS ON YOUR CHILDREN the importance of watching the conductor 
at all times during the singing. Watch especially his movements 
indicating changes in tempo and dynamics. 

About the Composer , 1685 - 1750 

Johann Sebastian Bach came from a large family of musicians in Germany. 

He was the greatest of them all. His works included music for organ, church 

and secular music, instrumental music, cantatas, and masses sung the world over, 



11 



IV. PULCINELLA SUITE 
Sinfonia 
Tarantella 
Toccata 
Vivo 
Minuet 
Finale 
Igor Stravinsky 
1882 - 1971 



Columbia 
MS-7093 



PULCINELLA SUITE is from Igor Stravinsky's Ballet in One Act . The 
music is based on themes from various works of the Italian composer, 
Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1710 - 1736) . It was the Russian Ballet 
Director, Sergei Diaghilev, who suggested the idea. After working 
in his own creative way, transforming the style by his special magic, 
Stravinsky has been quoted as saying: "The only music of Pergolesi 
that I like is PULCINELLA." 

The original score for small orchestra calls for three singers, a 
tenor, bass, and soprano. The orchestra requires 33 persons: 2 Flutes, 
2 Oboes, 2 Bassoons, 2 Horns in F, 1 Trumpet in C, 1 Trombone (Tenor Bass). 
The strings are divided into two sections: a Solo Quintet with a first and 
second violin, viola, cello, and bass; and an Orchestra Quintet consisting 
of 4 first violins, 4 second violins, 4 violas, 3 cellos and 3 double basses 

The Ballet music is divided into eleven short sections: 

1. Sinfonia (Overture)* 

2. Serenata 

3. Scherzino 

4. Allegro 

5. Andantino 

6. Tarantella* 

7. Toccata* 

8. Gavotte with two variations 

9. Vivo - Duetto (trombone and double bass)* 

10. Minuet to* 

11. Finale* 

The six numbers marked with asterisks will be played by the North Carolina 
Little Symphony at your children's concert. 



Some Teaching Suggestions 



Before you start working on the music of PULCINELLA with children 
it is very important that you become thoroughly familiar with it yourself, 
Because it is Stravinsky, you will find it may not communicate itself to 
you the first time you play it. But keep the record available and listen 
to it as many times as possible. Since the record is not banded you may 
have difficulty putting the needle down at the beginning of each of the 
six numbers. Playing time for the entire Suite is twenty-two minutes. 
When you can, listen to all of it because the sequence of numbers with 
their contrasting keys, rhythmic and dynamic variety is a part of 
the artistic whole. 

The beginning themes of the six numbers are in Symphony Stories . Play 
these on the piano, or have someone play them for you, until you are 
able to recognize each one when you hear it on the recording. 



12 



SINFONIA 






f 



WE&3L 



jtfff 



tw 



pffg 



tor 



Form: 



B 



a a 

Strings 



Oboe 
Bassoon 



a a 
Strings 



Cello 



a Horn 
a Strings 



B< 



Strings 
Oboe 



There are two themes which dominate the music. As children listen, suggest 
that they discover the difference in these contrasting elements. When they are 
sufficiently familiar with the two themes they may enjoy identifying them by 
creating original dance movement, by painting designs, etc. The B theme is em- 
bellished with trills. The A theme is strong and straightforward. 

TARANTELLA 

3 r<\ 



im 



L/IW Ul 



This is a typical 6/8 tarantella rhythm. The fast tempo and the dynamic changes 
make it an exciting piece for listening. The strings dominate throughout. Two 
solo melodies which children may discover are played by the oboe and (towards the end) 
by the flutes fortissimo . You might encourage the children to make small movements 
sitting in groups on the floor. A leader for each group will help to create variety. 



TOCCATA 

Tru. rrtpet 




£ 



ffl^iinT' 



The Toccata is in 2/4 and the pattern of eighth notes is forcefully played throughout: 



jtt] rrn rm 



This is a good piece to bring out the sounds of certain instruments. Listen for 
1) Trombone and trumpet in the opening 2) Piccolo and flutes 3) Oboe 4) Bassoons 
5) Trombone and trumpet as in the beginning, but concluding the piece with a strong 
crescendo and a very loud ending. 

VIVO 

7rombor>£. 
pontile B*.±s 



S 



^5 



m 



j¥ 



W> 



I 



T^ 



WW 



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Children are sure to enjoy the comic effects of the trombone and double bass playing a 
duet. After a short introduction in which the trombone plays glissandos (slides), 
both instruments join forces for the interesting theme which goes alternately up and 
down in short spurts. There are opportunities for all kinds of pantimiming and 
funny stunds. 



Form: 



13 



MINUET 



mmm 



p> 



i s i j j * 



M 



The Minuet in 3/8 is smooth- flowing and quiet. The lush quality of the French horn 
is displayed in the opening theme. As the theme is repeated the lyrical beauty of 
each instrument in turn keeps the quiet mood to the end. Help your children to 
identify these instruments in sequence: 

1) French horn 2) Violin 3) Trombone 4) Trumpet 5) Viola 
This is wonderful music to develop relaxation and beautiful free movement. 



FINALE 

8^ 



wms 



sikm mm^ 



±± • *= 



The relentless repetition of rhythmic pattern, so typical of Stravinsky, builds up 
to an exciting climax. Over the dominating pulse, occasional solo instruments are 
heard: 1) Flutes 2) Violin 3) High flute (like piccolo) 4) Oboe 5) Violins. 



The S t o r 



o f 



Pulcinella 



When the ballet begins some pretty young dancing girls are in love with Pulcinella. 
Their handsome Italian boy friends are very jealous, and decide that they will find 
a way to kill Pulcinella. As they are about to attack him Pulcinella hires a sub- 
stitute, dressed in his clothes. The false Pulcinella pretends to die as the real 
one escapes and disguises himself as a magician. The young men think they are rid of 
him, but he returns, pretending that he is a magician, and brings his double back to 
life. It turns out that the real Pulcinella is a kindhearted fellow after all. He 
arranges marriages for all the girls and boys. Then he gets married himself. 

About the Composer 

...Igor Stravinsky is the composer who shocked the ears of critics and audiences and 
ended up as the recognized master of twentieth century music. He is the greatest 
musical innovator of modern times. Stravinsky never concerned himself with 
pleasing his listeners but followed his own inner dictates, exploring new paths, 
and setting new trends for composers of the future. 

•••World-wide acclaim came to him in large measure through his ballets. It was a 
fortunate day in the life of twenty-year-old Stravinsky when on a holiday in 
Germany he met Rimsky-Korsakof f . This great teacher was much impressed with the 
young man's talent and urged him to enroll as a student at the St. Petersburg 
Conservatory. Later he took him as a private pupil. 

...When the Russian ballet impresario, Sergei Diaghilev, heard Stravinsky's 

Scherzo Fantastique at a concert in St. Petersburg he immediately commissioned him 
to write The Fire Bird . The ballet was a brilliant success. It was followed by 
Petrouchka and, in 1913, by The Rite of Spring . This was by far the most daring 
of his ballet scores, and caused a riot at the first performance. 

...As a person, Stravinsky was a warm human being, an affectionate father, and a con- 
siderate husband. He and his second wife, Vera, settled in Hollywood, California, 
where their home was always open to their many friends . 



14 

V. THE LITTLE WHITE DONKEY from "Histoires No. 2" RCA Victor - Adventures 

Jacques Ibert in Music, Grade 2 

1890 - 1962 LE - 1001 

THE LITTLE WHITE DONKEY by the French composer, Jacques Ibert is 
an excellent example of "program" music - music that is descriptive 
of an event or tells a story. Without knowing the title, it is 
likely that some of the children will be able to hear and identify 
many of the instrumental sounds used to suggest the characteristics 
of a donkey. 

Listening Highlights and Suggested Classroom Activities 



TROTTING RHYTHM 
2/4 

JTO fffl 

LRRR LRRR 



The form is A B A. 

In both A sections the trotting rhythm of the donkey is prominent. 

Children may suggest tapping it with 

sticks, wood block, cocanut shells 

or with pencil. Or they may clap it 

with alternating hands on their knees. 
The "heehaw" sounds of the braying donkey are sometimes heard in a high register; 

sometimes on lower pitches. 
Low strings play the trotting rhythm; above it, is the whistling tune of the boy. 
Children may suggest dramatizing the music or creating free dance movements; and 

they may enjoy writing stories or poems about the donkey. 
As related listening you may want to play recordings of other "donkey" music: 

On the Trail from "Grand Canyon Suite" by Ferde Grofe and 

Personnages with Long Ears from "The Carnival of Animals" by Saint-Saens. 
Work with the librarian on making a collection of donkey stories and pictures. 
Suggest the possibilities of using paints, finger paints, clay, etc. In the 
bibliography you will find a bilingual filmstrip (Spanish and English) "Platero 
and I" - the story of a boy and his pet donkey. Consult the Teacher's Guide to 
the RCA Album for further suggestions. 

About the Composer 

...Jacques Ibert was born in Paris on the 15th of August, 1890. 
He lived in Paris most of his life, and died there in 1962. 

. . .Jacques was destined to be a composer although his father was opposed to his 

son having anything to do with music. He expected him to become a business man. 
His mother, who was a fine pianist, disregarded her husband's wishes, and gave 
him lessons from the time he was four years old. 

...By the time Ibert was a young man of twenty he was accepted as a student at the 
Paris Conservatory where his music education began in earnest. He became a pupil 
of Gedalge and Faure. He won the coveted prix de Rome in 1919 with his 
Le Poete et la Fee . In 1940 he was appointed Director of the French Academy in 
Rome — the first musician to hold that post since the founding of the Academy. 
He continued to compose in a variety of media: opera, ballet, symphonic works, 
concertos and sonatas for individual instruments. In later years he made a 
specialty of writing a very effective type of descriptive music for the movies. 

... Ibert 's short pieces for the piano became very popular and were performed on 
countless programs. The Little White Donkey is one of his piano pieces that 
has enjoyed enormous success. 



15 



VI. 



BALLET SUITE No. 1 

Petite Ballerina 
Pizzicato Polka 

Dmitri Shostakovich 

1906 - 1974 



RCA Victor-Adventures 
in music, Grade 2 

LE - 1001 and 
RCA Victor - Adventures 
in Music, Grade 1 

LES - 1000 



PETITE BALLERINA and PIZZICATO POLKA are both from Dmitri 
Shostakovich's Ballet Suite No. 1. The composer's interest 
in ballet music began in his childhood when he wrote dance 
music for his little sister who was studying ballet. In 
Russia the ballet has always been an important part of musical 
and artistic life. Shostakovich has continued to be interested 
in writing orchestral music for the ballet. 



Listening Highlights 



PETITE BALLERINA 

The music is in 3/4 with a strong underlying pulse like 

a waltz: 



3 
H 



m\\\ ipii|jji( 



Tiptoe staccato movements are contrasted with gliding swaying 
rhythms. After listening a number of times, the children may 
be able to recognize some of the musical changes in the five 
sections of the piece. 



Introduction: 

A - Pizzicato (plucked strings) 

B - Big, smooth gliding or swaying 
swaying movements 



Steady tempo throughout 
High-pitched "music box" sound 



C - Pizzicato again like A, but shorter; different melody 

D — Big, smooth gliding or swaying movements; big retard 

A - Return to first pizzicato section 

PIZZICATO POLKA 

The most conspicuous instrument in this Polka is the violin, played 
"pizzicato" (plucked with finger) . 

The form is A B A 

Introduction 

A - First theme played softly Key of A Minor 

Tempo is deliberate — then faster and faster; louder and louder 
B - Loud and fast Major key 

A - Return of A section 

Suggestion for classroom activity 

Both numbers are excellent for free creative dance movement. For ideas 

refer to the section on Creative Movement. 

Read stories about the ballet. See books listed in Bibliography. 

Use children's ideas for related art activities: painting, finger painting, etc 



16 

About the Composer 

. . .No Russian composer has attained more popularity than Dmitri Shostakovich. 
At times he has had to endure criticism for not following the strict rules 
set up for Soviet composers, but his works have been performed by major 
orchestras all over the world. Conductors are always eager to give first 
performances of any new composition by Shostakovich. 

...His critics are divided into two groups: those in the Western world, and 
those in the Soviet Union. Critics outside of Russia blame him for try- 
ing to please the political dictates of the Soviet Ministry of Culture 
instead of following his own creative instincts. In Russia, on the other 
hand, he is accused of following Western trends in compositions that are 
unsuitable for performance in his own country. 

...Through all the controversies Shostakovich has maintained his own integrity 
and proved his worth as a sincere artist with fine technical skill and a 
thorough understanding of instruments. In musical values his success 
needs no defense. His works, extremely wide in range, include thirteen 
symphonies, two operas, ballets, trios, quartets and quintets for various 
chamber music combinations, sonatas, music for films, concertos for solo 
instruments and orchestra. 

...Shostakovich married a person of great intellect and charm. His wife, Nina, 
was a physicist, specializing in cosmic ray research. For years, before 
her death in 1956, they lived in a spacious apartment in Moscow which 
served as home and studio. Shostakovich was never considered a tempera- 
mental musician. When his children were growing up he didn't shut himself 
off in order to compose. Their playing in front of his door was never 
a distraction. 

...Maxim, Shostakovich's son, was much interested in music and studied at 
the Moscow Conservatory. It was not unusual to find father and son, each 
at one of the two grand pianos in the apartment, playing Bach or Mozart 
together. Maxim's sister, Galina, although not a trained musician, loved 
music and spent a great deal of time listening to records. When she was 
asked what she liked best to listen to, she usually replied: "Papa's works, 
then Bach, Tchaikovsky or Mussorgsky." 

...When Mrs. Shostakovich was asked about her husband's working habits she 
said: "He just sits down at his writing desk, writes morning, noon or 
evening. He works in long stretches of time and sometimes forgets to eat. 
If he writes something that needs a lot of revision, he tears it up and 
begins all over again." 

...What would a man with such a finely developed sense of discipline, and 

such powers of concentration seek as a diversion? For Dmitri Shostakovich 
it is going to the circus, reading novels, listening to jazz, enjoying 
football games and other outdoor sports. And, above all, playing a great 
game of chess. 



17 



VII. 



SONG: JOHN HENRY 



American Folk Song 



Accompaniment : 



Making Music Your Own, Book 5 
Silver Burdett 



JOHN HENRY is printed on the inside back cover of Symphony Stories . 
Children should memorize all four stanzas of the song to sing with 
the orchestra. They are not permitted to bring copies of the words or 
music into the concert hall. In preparation for the concert practice 
the song without the help of a piano. Autoharp chords may be used to 
hold the rhythm together, or a drum might play on the first and third 
beats. 

Before the audience stands to sing the song a selected school instrumental 
group will play one stnza of JOHN HENRY. Children chosen to take part in 
the instrumental group must be rehearsed in every participating school. 
The groups should be rehearsed in exactly the same way and at the same 
tempo. The instrumental group is "on its own" at the concert and will 
not be expected to play with the orchestra. 

INSTRUMENTS TO BE INCLUDED IN THE CHILDREN'S PLAYING GROUP 



Winds 

Strings 
Bells 

SEATING PLAN 



PLAYING 
INSTRUCTIONS 



Recorders, flutes, small winds (such as 

tonettes, melody flutes or song flutes.) 

Violins 

Melody bells, xylophones, resonator or tone bells. 

Players in the Instrumental Group should be seated together, 
with a teacher-director in charge. If possible place them 
in the center, facing the stage. 

As a short introduction and signal to atart, the bells 

will sound two G's in tempo on the first and third beats of 

a preparatory measure. (All instruments play 2 stanzas of 

the song . ) 

Winds and strings play the melody throughout . 

Bells are added on the second and fourth lines. 



SINGING THE SONG AT THE CONCERT 

After the Instrumental Group has played the song through twice, the 
conductor will invite the audience to stand and sing four stanzas with the 
orchestra. Tell the children to watch for the signal to stand. The orches- 
tra will play a short introduction, then the conductor will give the cue 
to begin singing. Impress on your children the importance of watching the 
conductor at all times during the singing. Watch especially his movements 
indicating changes in tempo and dynamics . 

TEACHING THE SONG IN REHEARSALS 



The meter is 4/4 




Preparatory beat is on "3 




p rmpB i-a"h>v- y b c 91 



Practice the words to achieve clear diction. 



18 

VIII. JOHN HENRY Columbia 

Aaron Copland M 33586 

1900 - 

AARON COPLAND wrote his orchestral composition entitled "John Henry" in 1940. 
It was revised in 1952, printed and copyrighted in England the following year. 
The work was commissioned by the Columbia Broadcasting Company. The legend of 
John Henry is probably the most widely known folk story in all of Negro literature. 
The strong steel-driving hero was the subject of countless folk songs, ballads, 
and tales. According to the many verses accumulated by collectors, John Henry had 
no enemies — only admirers who worshipped him as a symbol of the "natural" man 
who with his hammer and his will power conquered a machine. He is quoted as 
saying: "I'm nothing but a natural man; before I'll let your steam drill beat 
me I'll die with my hammer in my hand." Just as his super-strength was admired in 
life so was death an occasion for hundreds of people to come from all parts of the 
world to see the famous John Henry. On his tombstone his wife had engraved 

"Here lies the steel driving man." 

From the many versions of the folk song Aaron Copland uses one as a main theme. 
The melody is printed in Symphony Stories . This theme is the unifying idea, 
returning again and again, played by different instruments. If you can familiarize 
the children with this tune, they will be able to recognize its return. The in- 
struments appear in this order: 1) Clarinets 2) French horns 3) Bassoon and 
Trombone 4) Strings. 

The music in between is derived from fragments of the melodic material, in 
rhythmic patterns that suggest a railroad train. 

The exciting part of the orchestration is Copland's use of percussion. In addition 
to Side drum, Bass drum, and Triangle, the score calls for an Anvil and Sandpaper. 
Perhaps Mr. Copland realized that it might not be easy for an orchestra conductor 
to find an anvil, so he says at the bottom of the score "Any hard metallic 
sound will do." 

Your children will find it interesting to listen for the "hard metallic sounds" 
and when they know the story of John Henry they are sure to realize that this is 
a steel-driving hammer. 

A Book to Read 

The authentic research on the many phases of John Henry - both legends and true 
stories - was done by Dr. Guy B. Johnson. His book, entitled "John Henry - 
Tracking Down a Negro Legend," was first published by the University of North 
Carolina Press at Chapel Hill in 1929. It was reprinted by A M S Press, Inc. in 
1969, and there was a second printing in 1974. Dr. Johnson, who now lives with 
his wife in Chapel Hill, is Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology at the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

If this delightful book is not in your library, it is now available, and may be 
ordered from A M S Press, Inc., 56 East 13th Street, New York, N. Y. 10003. 



19 



About the Composer 

Aaron Copland, born in Brooklyn on November 14, 1900, is today considered 
to be America's leading composer. You will find information on his early 
years in Symphony Stories , The comments here are to help you know a little 
more about the delightful, generous human being he is, and to gain more 
insight into his philosophy and his working habits. 

...Copland never writes music for anything he doesn't like. For several 
years his income came from work for big commercial movie companies. He 
avoided descending to the level of the usual Hollywood scores. He had great 
influence on some of the resident routine composers to raise their standards. 
He was always a composer of "prestige" — brought in from the outside. 

...His working habits may explain his artistic success: 

1. He studies the cue sheet with its timing and description 
of sequences. 

2. He views the film a few times. 

3. He sees the film again and again while writing. 

4. He runs individual scenes over and over to get his musical 
ideas. He extracts the essence from the film itself, instead 
of imposing his music on it. 

5. He is very careful to see that the music is approproate. 

To quote him: "I don't like to hear a piano in the music for 
an outdoor scene." 

6. He orchestrates his own music. 

7. He embraces native folk sources and jazz, but his style is 
original. It has been said that Copland had more influence on 
American folk music than it has had on him. 

...Copland's style has undergone changes. It might be roughly divided 
into two stages: 
I. Formative stage 

Small works; "Cat and the Mouse." 
Symphony for Organ and Orchestra 
Dissonance of the Twenties 

A composer with modern ideas in those days was thought 
of as a naughty boy, but all young composers were ex- 
ploring new and shocking sounds. 
European influence with strong American flavor. 
II. Music for the Theatre (1925) 
Incorporation of Jazz 
Increased leanness in texture 
Intricate and abstract patterns 
Ballet 

Works in abstract form 
Economy of means; transparency 
Folk music 

...Copland has taught, lectured, conducted orchestras, moved about in the 
United States, Mexico, Latin America and other countries. His friends 
will tell you he is modest, not egocentric, and is a warm sociable person. 



20 



IX. SOIREES MUSICALES — MARCH 
Rossini-Britten 
Rossini, 1792 - 1868 
Britten, 1913 - 1976 



RCA Adventures in 
Music, Grade 1 
LES - 1000 



SOIREES MUSICALES, Op. 9, is a Suite of five movements for orchestra, 
based on music of Rossini. It was written in 1936 and published two 
years later. The work was commissioned by Lincoln Kirstein for his 
American Ballet Theatre. The five movements are: 1) MARCH 2) CANZONETTA 
3) TIROLESE 4) BOLERO and 5) TARANTELLA. Britten took his themes from 
some piano music of the Italian opera composer. He did not change 
Rossini's basic melodies in any way, but he did a brilliant job of 
orchestration — which accounts for the popularity of the SOIREES MUSICALES 
as concert pieces on symphony programs. 

Britten's score is written in such a way that it can be performed by either 
a large or small orchestra. The instrumentation: 2 Flutes or Piccolo; 
2 Oboes; 2 Clarinets in B flat; 2 Bassoons; 4 Horns; 2 Trumpets; 2 Trom- 
bones; Timpani; Xylophone; Percussion; Harp or Piano; Strings. 

MARCH is the first of the five movements. Before the announcement of the 
Theme by the clarinets there is an Introduction of nine measures dominated 
by the following pattern: 



Brasses 
INTRO. Woodwinds 
Percussion 

8 measures 

8 measures 

Interlude 
16 measures 



Solo Clarinets Theme 
Flutes & Violins Theme 



(See Symphony Stories ) 



Percussion, Strings, Woodwinds 4 measures T _ , 
„ , „, ' & ' . I Repeated 

Solo Flutes 4 measures J 



4 measures 



Solo Oboes 



Theme 



measures 



Solo Piccolo 



Theme 



8 measures 



8 measures 



Solo Xylophone & Theme 
High Strings 

All Strings & Theme 
Percussion 



8 measures 



Woodwinds, Brasses, Theme 
Percussion, Strings 



Listening Highlights 

This is an excellent number in which to help children identify specific 
instruments, to become aware of dynamic changes (soft, loud) and to 
hear clearly "high" and "low" contrasts. 

Children will enjoy playing drum patterns with thythm sticks, tone blocks, 
snare or other types of drums: , _ ___ _— i <v 

inn % n\n \\ % rn n|P 

Creative movement might identify 1) High and low 2) Soft and loud 
3) The main theme as a bugle call 4) Various marching technics. 



21 
About the Composers 

ROSSINI - See Tips to Teachers, page 

BRITTEN 

...Benjamin Britten, the youngest of four children, was born at Lowestoft, in 
Suffolk, on November 22, 1913. He was intensely proud of his native England, 
and even though he became a pacifist during the World War years, he spent 
much of his time giving wartime recitals. With his friend, the noted singer, 
Peter Pears, he toured the country, performing in remote small towns and 
villages where people had never been to a concert before. Sometimes the 
concerts were in prisons, where the huge audiences responded with much 
enthusiasm. 

...Britten, the accomplished composer and gifted pianist, had begun his pro- 
fessional life at the age of nineteen when he finished his studies at the 
Royal College of Music. He went to work for a film company where he had to 
write scores for six or seven instruments and produce all the effects the 
film demanded. There were sounds other than the musical ones to be imitated. 
Britten describes how the sounds of a large ship unloading in dock were in- 
vented: "In the studio we had pails of water which we slopped everywhere, 
drain pipes with coal slipping down them, model railways, whistles, and 
every kind of paraphernalia we could think of." 

. . .The script of a film called Night Mail required the right sound for a 

train going through a tunnel and approaching nearer and nearer. Benjamin 
Britten had the brilliant idea of recording a cymbal crash and then revers- 
ing the sound-track so that the dying-away vibrations became louder 
and louder . 

...Britten's travels took him to many countries. After a visit to America, 
which Britten found to be "enormously stimulating" he decided that he must 
get back to England. It was 1942, a difficult year for crossing the Atlantic. 
He and Peter Pears had to wait many months before they could get passage on 
a small Swedish cargo boat. For four weeks at sea they dodged back and forth 
to avoid enemy submarines. But Britten went on composing all the time. 

...The return to Suffolk was sad for Benjamin Britten. England had been bombed; 
old friends had died or been killed in the war; his home in Lowestoft was 
sold after the death of his parents. Fortunately, he still owned an old mill 
in Snape which had been restored. His sister and her two children were 
living there, and it now became his peaceful refuge. 

...Benjamin Britten always had a great interest in children, and many of his 
works were compositions for or involving young performers, for example: 
"Let's Make an Opera," "Noye's Fludde," "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and 
"Children's Crusade." His other works included eight operas, a ballet, stage 
works for performance in a church, choral and orchestral compositions, chamber 
music, and pieces for voice and solo instruments. 

A Book to Read : BENJAMIN BRITTEN by Alan Kendall with photographs in color and black 
and white. Introduction by Yehudi Menuhi. (Macmillan, 1973) 



22 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



About Music 
Britten, Benjamin 
Copland , Aaron 
Copland , Aaron 
Davis & Broido 



Davis, May & 
Davis, Anita 

Deri, Otto 



Rublowsky, John 

Scholes, Percy 

Shay, Arthur 

Thomson, Virgil 

Ballet 

Atkinson, Margaret F. 
& Hillman 

Streatfeild, Noel 

Streatfeild, Noel 

Tichener 

Composers 

Berger, Arthur 

Craft, Robert & 
Stravinsky, Vera 

Dobrin, Arnold 

Hoist, Imogen 



Books . . . Films . . . Filmstrips 
BOOKS 



THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF MUSIC (illustrated) 

OUR NEW MUSIC 

WHAT TO LISTEN FOR IN MUSIC 

MUSIC DICTIONARY 

Over 800 definitions of musical words, 
foreign terms, and instruments with 
graphic pictures 

ALL ABOUT MUSIC (children) 

EXPLORING TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC 
Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Britten 

MUSIC IN AMERICA 

THE OXFORD JUNIOR COMPANION TO MUSIC 

WHAT IT'S LIKE TO BE A MUSICIAN (children) 

AMERICAN MUSIC SINCE 1910 

DANCERS OF THE BALLET (Grades 7, 8) 

BALLET SHOES (children) 

A YOUNG PERSON'S GUIDE TO THE BALLET 

BALLET 

AARON COPLAND 
STRAVINSKY 

IGOR STRAVINSKY: HIS LIFE AND TIMES 
BACH 



Garden City 
Whittlesey House 
Whittlesey House 
Doubleday 



Oxford paper 

Holt 

Crowell-Collier 
Oxford 

Reilly & Lee 
Holt 

Knopf 

Random 

Warne 

Troubador Press 

Oxford 
Knopf 

D. White 
Crowell 



23 



Powell, Elsa Z. 

Posell, Elsa Z. 

Reingold, Carmel B. 

Searle, Humphrey and 
Lay ton, Robert 

Young, Percy M. 
Conductors 
Ewen, David 
Surplus, Robert W. 

Folklore 
Botkin, B. A. 

Carmer , Carl 

Johnson, Guy B. 

Killins, John 0. 
Lisker, Tom 
Lomax , Alan 

Price, Barbara W. 
Rounds, Glen 
Shapiro, Irwin 

Stoutenburg, Adrian 
Yurchenco, Henrietta 

Opera 
Cross, Milton 



AMERICAN COMPOSERS (children) Houghton 

RUSSIAN COMPOSERS Houghton 

BACH, REVOLUTIONARY OF MUSIC Watts 

TWENTIETH CENTURY COMPOSERS, Vol. Ill Holt 
Britain, Scandinavia, Netherlands 
Benjamin Britten, pp. 70 - 83 

STRAVINSKY D. White 



FAMOUS CONDUCTORS Dodd 

FOLLOW THE LEADER (children) Lerner 

The Story of Conducting 



A TREASURY OF AMERICAN FOLKLORE 
Foreword by Carl Sandburg 

AMERICA SINGS 

Stories and Songs of Our Country's Growing 

JOHN HENRY 

Tracking Down a Negro Legend 

A MAN AIN'T NOTHIN' BUT A MAN 

TALL TALES: AMERICAN MYTHS (children) 

THE FOLK SONGS OF NORTH AMERICA 
John Henry, pp. 560 - 563 

AMERICAN FOLK TALES (children) 

OL' PAUL, THE MIGHTY LOGGER 

JOHN HENRY AND THE DOUBLE-JOINTED 
STEAM DRILL 

AMERICAN TALL TALES 

A MIGHTY HARD LOAD: The Life of 
Woody Guthrie (illustrated) 



Crown 

Knopf 

U. N. C. Press 

Little 

Raintree Pubs. Ltd, 

Doubleday 

Hallmark 

Avon 

Messner 

Viking 
McGraw 



NEW MILTON GROSS' COMPLETE STORIES OF Doubleday 
THE GREAT OPERAS (children) 



Gass & Weinstock 



THROUGH AN OPERA GLASS 



Abelard 



24 



Johnston, Johanna 
in cooperation with 
Metropolitan Opera 
Guild 



THE BARBER OF SEVILLE 
Attractively illustrated in color 
and black and white 



G. P. Putnam's 
Sons 



Streatfeild, Noel 



FIRST BOOK OF THE OPERA (children) 



Watts 



INSTRUMENTS OF THE 

ORCHESTRA 

Jam Handy Series 



THE BARBER OF 

SEVILLE 

Jam Handy No. 4 from 

Opera and Ballet 

Stories 



FILMS and FILMSTRIPS 

6 color filmstrips 
6 recordings 



Color filmstrip 

with correlated recording 



Prentice Hall, Inc. 
Education Division 
Englewood Cliffs, N.J, 
07632 

Same as above 



ONCE UPON A SOUND 
Jam Handy Scott 
Title 400 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



4 color filmstrips 

Cassette 

One instrument from each of the 

4 sections: brass, woodwinds, 

strings, percussion 

Films - Brass Choir, Woodwind 
Choir, Percussion & Strings 
also Story of A Violin 



Same as above 



U. N. C. Audio-Visual 

Department, 

111 Abernethy Hall, 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

27514 



OPERA: MAN, MUSIC 
AND DRAMA 



PLATERO AND I - The 
Story of A Boy and 
his Pet Donkey 



Color film 

Outlines history of opera with 

brief excerpts from some famous operas 

Bilingual - Spanish and English 
2 full color sound filmstrips 
Records or cassettes 
Guitar accompaniment 



Illinois University 
Visual Aids Service 



Keyboard Publications, 
1346 Chapel Street, 
New Haven, Conn. 
06511 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 




3 3091 00766 3818